Which autograft will reduce my risk of graft failure (re-tear) within 6 years?

Please indicate how often you performed each activity in your healthiest and most active state, in the past year.

Risk assessment for autograft failure (re-tear) within 6 years

Normal knee laxity

BTB

Hamstring

In the "Normal knee laxity" figure, each color-coded box predicts the 6-year failure risk for each type of ACLR graft. Colors highlight the difference in risk between the two graft choices. If green, the difference is ≤3%; if yellow, the difference is 3-5%; if red, the difference is >5%. The majority of knees have normal knee laxity. Only your surgeon can determine if you have high-grade knee laxity, which increases your risk of failure for both grafts. If your surgeon determines that you have high-grade knee laxity, you should refer to the "High-grade knee laxty" figure. In either case, the goal of this information is to use it in a shared decision-making model with your provider.

High-grade knee laxity

BTB

Hamstring

In the "High-grade knee laxity" figure, each color-coded box predicts the 6-year failure risk for each type of ACLR graft. Colors highlight the difference in risk between the two graft choices. If green, the difference is ≤3%; if yellow, the difference is 3-5%; if red, the difference is >5%. Only your surgeon can determine if you have high-grade knee laxity. In either case, the goal of this information is to use it in a shared decision-making model with your provider.

What about my normal knee?